School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21  School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21  School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21  School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21
This is what we want to write for the theme. This is also known as wall text. The number of this text is around 200-500 words.

This is what we want to write for the theme. This is also known as wall text. The number of this text is around 200-500 words.
This is what we want to write for the theme. This is also known as wall text. The number of this text is around 200-500 words.

This is what we want to write for the theme. This is also known as wall text. The number of this text is around 200-500 words.













 Marcelese Cooper /
"The Messenger"


"The Sentinel"


 Rebecca Poarch /




"An Act of Love Toward Myself"


"Sacrum"


"In Bloom"


"Dream Body"


"To the Waters and the Wild"


 Briana Lynn /


For a long time I didn’t like “affirmations” as a concept.
I didn’t like the word either.

I thought it’d lost significance because “affirmations” had become a part of pop culture rhetoric. I also felt like no number of times I said something could change how I felt about it.

Of all the reasons I didn’t connect with affirmations, I think the most prevalent—and the truth—was that I had a hard time connecting to an affirmation that wasn’t mine. It didn’t feel honest or accurate. I also couldn’t connect to a closed, fixed statement.

As I was in a period where I was feeling completely lost and untethered, I ended up in four conversations with four special people in my life. Through each of our conversations an affirmation appeared. For me they appeared as questions:




— “Who are you?”
— “Where do you come from?”
— “What do you know?”
— “What else do you know?”

— and I made the answers out to be anything. I found that I could repeat them, and mean it. I say who I am—and I can be anything, anyone. It changes depending on how I feel. I describe being from some place beyond “here.” The answer to what do I know is always, “All that I need to.” And also, “That I can have power whenever I choose. I can take back my power whenever I choose.”

These came to me when I felt powerless, when I had forgotten about the energy flowing around and through my body. As I repeated the exercise, I remembered my ability to access and transmute that energy.



I can use it, control it, bring it forward, expand it, speak to it—that power exists at all times. There’s no circumstance where I am powerless—that is the truth.

This guided meditation is an exercise in imagination, in making that power visible, and tangible. I practice as a reminder that there are more powerful forces out there than the ones we think control us—including our own. To close out the meditation, I repeat the affirmations.

We have access to things beyond the “power” of institutions and the inconveniences of the art world ecosystem. We can choose to believe differently—it’s all made up anyhow.