School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21  School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21  School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21  School of the Art Insititute of Chicago emerge Journal 20-21

By Ruby Dudasik


The Dream Issue of emerge is centered on the radical re-envisioning of our thinking, our ways of being, how we relate to one another and the world. “Queer Futures” presents a selection of work that reflects this commitment. The artists featured here engage with and challenge the queer experience, questioning what it means and looks like to live within and alongside existing frameworks of queerness.

Foundational to The Dream Issue as well is the recognition of value in non-textual work—it acknowledges that the visual, performed, spoken, heard, and experiential is just as valuable as textual work. It understands that words alone cannot always fully embody the fullness of meaning. With this in mind, “Queer Futures” as a theme is not exclusive. Its title alone is unable to contain the explosive, spiraling, expansive realities and possibilities presented here in their entirety. Queerness is a constant creation and recreation, an ongoing negotiation of ourselves and how we move throughout, relate to, exist in, and navigate the world. What connects these works is not the identity or label of “queerness”—which in itself is far too small—but instead a collective and radical re-imagining of what it could be. Through these creations, we see queer futures, pasts, and presents as they are ideally imagined to be.

The works presented as part of “Queer Futures” span various different types of media, including photo, poetry, sculpture, and film; they reveal private moments of intimacy and bridge connections across folklore, queer love, pop culture. These works explore the multitudes of being queer, and they embody the boundless creation possible when we allow ourselves to dream without limits. In their variety, they exemplify the impossibility of defining a singular experience of queerness.

These works invite you to join us in dreaming of a queer future.

The Dream Issue of emerge is centered on the radical re-envisioning of our thinking, our ways of being, how we relate to one another and the world. “Queer Futures” presents a selection of work that reflects this commitment. The artists featured here engage with and challenge the queer experience, questioning what it means and looks like to live within and alongside existing frameworks of queerness.

Foundational to The Dream Issue as well is the recognition of value in non-textual work—it acknowledges that the visual, performed, spoken, heard, and experiential is just as valuable as textual work. It understands that words alone cannot always fully embody the fullness of meaning. With this in mind, “Queer Futures” as a theme is not exclusive. Its title alone is unable to contain the explosive, spiraling, expansive realities and possibilities presented here in their entirety. Queerness is a constant creation and recreation, an ongoing negotiation of ourselves and how we move throughout, relate to, exist in, and navigate the world. What connects these works is not the identity or label of “queerness”—which in itself is far too small—but instead a collective and radical re-imagining of what it could be. Through these creations, we see queer futures, pasts, and presents as they are ideally imagined to be.

The works presented as part of “Queer Futures” span various different types of media, including photo, poetry, sculpture, and film; they reveal private moments of intimacy and bridge connections across folklore, queer love, pop culture. These works explore the multitudes of being queer, and they embody the boundless creation possible when we allow ourselves to dream without limits. In their variety, they exemplify the impossibility of defining a singular experience of queerness.

These works invite you to join us in dreaming of a queer future.

By: Ruby Dudasik













 Liv Meyer /
"i was in the psych ward
thinking about heaven"



"how i imagine my
imaginary girlfriend"



"cuddling with a girl who
i don't think likes me back"



 Melon Fernsebner /
Glory Hole is a physical, full scale manifestation of a trans* fantasy made into reality. I use the clay and glaze to build a potential for my trans* body beyond my perceived reality—as well as perceived realities of my body learned through cisgender culture. This vessel, Glory Hole, has the potential to amplify the viewer's voice or breath through each individual hole. These are not only sound holes, but penetrable holes in the bathroom wall.

I offer this vessel as a human-size pot that the viewer can use as a glory hole as intended, or to yell, or sing or breathe into, to touch, to move around, to exist with, to look at, to look through, and to extend themselves through me. Glory Hole is an attempt to take up space in a way that helps others take up space in the viewing. Glory Hole exacerbates the common cisgender approach to the glory hole, one of fantasy in the unknown and erasure of bodies in space. I begin to unravel what is so appealing in the unknown through giving the blank wall and the crude hole—the glory hole—space to express itself; space to express what we have put into it, attached mentally to it, written on its surface.

Naming myself proudly trans*, with my phone number on Glory Hole's wall, and identifying myself with words like "for fun time trans*" names the identity of the fantasized and fetishized. I want to acknowledge and examine the fetish of my body, my identity as a trans* person. I want to extend myself beyond the sexually defined explanations of my body. By being a Glory Hole that is trans*-inclusive, made by my hand, for myself as much as it is for others, I hope its function and use extend the binary thinking surrounding a figure like a glory hole in the wall.

"Glory Hole"



 Azul Nogueron /
I explore my trans identity by being honest. I depict my story onto relics of my past and paint a story of who I am. I paint portraits of myself and embroider relics of my past into my body, to demonstrate that although there have been a few surface changes that I am still the same person that people have gotten to know the past few years. My “dirty laundry” will be installed as such, drying for the world to see but my dirty laundry will be not be without my words, my experiences, my emotions and my voice.

I am They but now you will hear me as Him, because my voice is my power, and only I can judge myself as worthy.

"Chichona"


"Gay Cowboy"


"Gordis"


 Sam Kyung Lee /
Part I

On seeking queer diaspora—how we exchange one form of unknowing for another:

The clouds had fallen low that evening. They fell in half-greys, touching the tops of trees, as if they had been pulled out in wisps from within the trees themselves, their boughs swept against the darkening frames of the sky. We watched the trees, their green shadows pouring into the same shapes, the same darkening pools, seeping into each other until something tore beneath, their depths shrouded by their movement, their blackish-greens that filled and filled, without end.

At first the trees spilled in masses along the arcs of the road, their smells close enough to breathe. We felt near, enveloped in the arms of something strange and immense, deeper than we could imagine, and our unknowing gave us ease.

But as we drove on, the trees beginning to recede, we felt ourselves returning to our narrower channels, the bodies returning to definite lines, trunks, leaves, as spaces between embossed against the night, and I felt my chest slowly cave, constrict at this re-embodied air, the lands around us fallen bare before us. The trees now sparsely populated the fields, and the sky - having replaced the clouds - descended with all its immensity toward us, a deluge upon our eyes like a falling body. I felt suddenly surrounded by all that was no longer there, the arborescent shadows and blurs, once more untethered and exposed...



Yet at the fell of the sky I thought of you and remembered. With a grin on my cheeks I did not shut my eyes—I opened my lips and swallowed the endless supply—


"한국같아"


"Grief is an opening "


"Inheritance (i)"


"No face (ii)"


"Hadn’t noticed him before"


"You know I was into girls
when I was your age."



"I resented the contentment
of the fields"



Catgut Stitches My Fissures



"Packed Earth"


"Folded"


"An excerpt from HD’s ‘Pursuit'"


"Openings"


 Olivier /
I'd love to imagine what those buff, rugged Bigfoot hunters would do when they see their hairy, magnificent Bigfoot. Instead of pulling the triggers on their guns, they'd blow Bigfoot a little kissy. I think about Bigfoot hunting quite a lot. It is unquestionably a queer act. Scruffy bearded men, working together as an orgy, admiring each other’s gadgets and evidence. They hide together in the woods, sniffing Bigfoot's hair, and lusting for the bigger, better Bigfoot footprints.

Because of our focus on empiricism in Western epistemology, the only way to prove Bigfoot’s existence is to produce a corpse. Until then, Bigfoot remains in cryptozoology and a frowned-upon topic of discussion.


Like queer love in this heteronormative society, queer people have experienced being asked “Where is your boyfriend?” or “Where is your girlfriend?”, experiencing unrequited love from straight crushes, and the worst—falling in love with someone who also loves you but you're both equally confused causing you to run away. There are no traces of your lovers. Where is no photographic evidence of you two together. Just a few pixelated images of your existence together. As real as this love is for you, people only see it as a myth.

Using Bigfoot videos and Bigfoot pop culture as iconography for queer love, I want to reimagine heteronormative pop love songs as allegories of Bigfoot hunting. Love is always there although it might only materialize in a few blurry photographs. I will always love in a mythological way.





Credits:

We are undercover (Part-Time Lover, Stevie Wonder)

Passion on the run
Strangers by day
Lovers by night
Don' t have a picture of you (Come Back, The Vagary)

The smell of your hair all I know
What a shame I didn't catch your name
I never heard a single word about you (This Is It, Michael Jackson)

Falling in love wasn't in my plan
And I know yes for sure, it is real
Wise men say only fools rush in (Can't help falling in love, Elvis Presley)

But I can't help falling in love with you
Then I saw their face (I'm a Believer, The Monkees)

Now I am a believer
I am in love
I hear footsteps as I watch you go (Foot steps, The Motels)

In search of that someone
I lie awake, waiting, wanting
Praying I hear your footsteps call me
My loneliness is killing me (...Baby One More Time, Britney Spears)

I must confess I still believe
I shouldn't have let you go
And now you're out of sight
You were always on my mind (You Were Always On My Mind, Gwen McCrae)

(Unaccompanied Cello Suite No . 1 in G Major, BWV 1007 I. Prelude, Yoyo Ma)
"I Love My Bigfoot"